We Should Have Seen This Coming

  How is it possible that in 2011 the world failed prevent famine in the Horn of Africa? The signs of disaster were present: two years of drought, no food storage, political instability, civil war and banned foreign assistance, but no one acted until it was too late.   Now, three months later, thousands of people have died and millions more are still in need of aid. So why do we still call a situation that is prone to turn into a famine and lead to the death of thousands of people adrought? Texas is currently experiencing a drought.  We had one of the hottest summers on record resulting in $5 billion of crop loss and wildfires that destroyed 1,600 homes.  But most of us remain unaffected, only aware of the drought because of imposed water restrictions, burn bans and a poor tubing season. Drought in Austin means we can still run our washing machines, our dishwashers, water our yards with a hose, take hot showers, keep our pools full and provide enough food for our families. That is not what defines this drought in Somalia. Ten million people in the Horn of Africa are still in need of immediate aid.  In the last three months, tens of thousands of people have died of starvation, including 29,000 children under the age of 5.  The UN estimates about 750,000 people (approximately...

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