Broadband – Public Infrastructure for U.S. Competitiveness

Twenty-second in average speed. Sixth in penetration. These statistics are the rankings of the broadband services in the United States compared to other countries around the world, according to Akamai’s most recent report. Surprised? Most Americans have adopted the mentality that the United States has been and will always be the world leader. But when it comes to the Internet, this is simply not the case. The world is rapidly changing because of technology and the Internet, but the United States is not adapting fast enough. According to the Speedmatters.org annual survey of Internet speeds, if the United States maintains its current rate of improvement, it will take 15 years for us to catch up to the internet connection speeds found today in South Korea. The Internet offers a faster, more efficient way for people to communicate, changing how most aspects of life and society operate. As stated in the federal government’s National Broadband Plan, the Internet “is changing how we educate children, deliver health care, manage energy, ensure public safety, engage government, and access, organize and disseminate knowledge.” Many, if not most, Americans fail to realize that we are rapidly falling behind other countries in Internet development. Countries around the world offer higher speeds, more availability, and lower costs. How do they do it? Is it because those countries can afford to supply more and faster Internet because...

Read More