Author: Leo Carter

Conservation in China and the Ivory Trade

Third and final in a series by Leo Carter (LBJ MGPS Student) covering his internship at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Tucked into a residential building outside of the Fourth Ring Road in Northeast Beijing, the field office of the Wildlife Conservation Society coordinates operations for all its ongoing conservation projects across China. From law enforcement training in counter-wildlife trafficking efforts in Southern China to Amur tiger protection and habitat restoration on the border of Russian Siberia in the far North East; from public awareness-building to governmental relations, a small, cohesive staff works around the clock to advance wildlife conservation...

Read More

Lobbying for the Wildlife Trafficking Enforcement Act

Photo Credit: Wildlife Conservation Society Second in a series by Leo Carter (LBJ MGPS Student) covering his internship at the Wildlife Conservation Society. The savannah stalker sprawled out on the dais, fur bristling, her tail tracing loops in the air. The cheetah basked in the cool, climate-controlled air of the Rayburn House office building. Elsewhere, in a room normally reserved for high-level congressional hearings and the approval budget bills to decide the spending priorities of the world’s wealthiest nation, two gawky lynx cubs wrestled with each other in front of tipsy onlookers. Everywhere around us, house interns scurried this way...

Read More

The Wildlife Conservation Society and the Battle to Protect Iconic Species

First in a series by Leo Carter (LBJ MGPS Student) covering his internship at the Wildlife Conservation Society. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), founded in 1895 in New York City, achieved its first major success when it helped to save the American Bison from extinction. Since then, aside from managing the zoos and aquariums of New York City, the organization has expanded to 500 conservation projects in 60 countries with the ambitious goal of protecting 50% of the world’s biodiversity. What makes WCS unique among wildlife NGOs is that its activist and lobbying divisions are directly supported by a strong base of scientists and conservationists in...

Read More

Quick Jump